We know cats, and we like to share that information.

At PAMPER, we believe cats are incredible companions who deserve to be pampered. They don’t just leave fur on our clothes, but also indelible paw prints on our hearts.

Learn more about what goes on in those furry little heads and how to give your cat the best possible quality of life by selecting a content category below.


Every cat is different, but you can learn a lot about their mood by paying close attention to their body language. From a fuzzy raised tail, to subtle twitching of the ears, these signs are more than just unique personality traits – they’re essential ways in which our cats communicate with us, and each other. While cats can’t always be predictable (they love to keep an air of mystery), here’s a basic guide to what your cat’s body language is telling you: Friendly
A friendly cat demonstrates its mood with alert, blinking eyes and ears pointed forward. While meowing can be a complaint or demand (for an extra helping of PAMPER), most of the time, intermittent meowing is a sign that your cat wants to communicate with you. Spread out whiskers and gentle nuzzling is also a sign that your cat is looking to spend some quality time with their favourite human. Unhappy/Uncomfortable
We all know cats can be fussy, and sometimes even diva-like, but it is essential that we read and respect their body language. When your cat is unhappy, they are not interested in any kind of contact, and may even hiss or growl at you. Cats do not want to be picked up when they are in a bad mood, and will sometimes arch their back and the hair on their back and tail will be raised. This is a sign of irritation and is often accompanied by slightly dilated pupils and flattened eyes. Some cats exhibit the same behaviour when they are sick or hurt. If your cat is acting uncharacteristically for an extended period of time, consult your vet. Relaxed
Besides being stretched out in a sunny patch, there are a few cues which can help you tell if your cat is relaxed. In addition to relaxed, pointed down ears, cats also tend to make their tails visible. While a curled up position may sometimes indicate fear, a relaxed cat is likely to allow you to approach them, with whiskers fanned out instead of being pulled back. If your cat shows you it’s belly, consider this the ultimate compliment. Cats’ natural instincts tell them to always keep their tummies protected, so if they’re sleeping belly-up or rolling on the floor in front of you, they are completely relaxed and trusting in your presence. (Tip: As tempting as it may be – it’s not always a good idea to go in for a tummy rub. Those instincts are strong, and could get you a swift swipe or even a bite.) Scared
Anything from an encounter with another cat, to a loud noise or an unfamiliar environment can make for one very fearful cat. While a scared cat may not always show its fear overtly, there are subtle clues. They are particularly sensitive to noise or sudden movements, and are likely to avoid you, even if they are generally quite open or loving. Dilated pupils and flattened ears are also tell-tale signs, with your cat’s tail pressed close to their body. Playful
This is by far the best mood for your cat to be in. Rolling side to side, stretched out on their back or pawing at you gently, these are clear behavioural signs that your cat is keen for a little tumble. This is the ideal moment to bring out a cat toy – or that red laser light.


Whether it’s an open suitcase, an old box, your brand new black shirt or your open laptop, cats seem to have a habit of sitting in or on whatever they can find. Why does my cat like to sit inside things?
It’s all down to basic instincts. Most cats are looking for somewhere to hide when they sit in things. While your little house cat may never have experienced the wild, they are responding to a species-specific desire to see their environment and potential prey, without being seen. Think inside the box
Allowing your cat to find new places to sit actually enhances their enjoyment of their home life. There’s no need to invest in expensive ‘cat caves’ – any old box will do. Even better – hide a toy in the box for your cat to find. What about electronics?
This one has nothing to do with animal instincts. Instead, cats often sit on electronics like laptops, gaming consoles and keyboards for their warmth (just like the hood of your car). For some cats, it’s also about the images on the screen, which they find stimulating – even though they don’t receive the image and information in the same way humans do. If you cat sits on an electronic device you’re busy using, that’s less about the warmth and more about getting your attention. Make sure there are no dangling or exposed wires (and definitely don’t let them bit into them) so there’s no danger of your cat hurting themselves. As for them sitting on your clothes… invest in a lint roller.


Playtime is some of the best bonding time with your cat. Even better if it is done with a purpose and helps to keep your cat’s body and mind healthy. Each cat has different needs and preferences when it comes to play. Here we break down five guiding principles for purposeful play:Know your cat’s limits
Play is meant to be fun – and while it may be tempting to get out the cat training book and try to teach your kitty some tricks, the main point is always enjoyment.

Introduce a variety of enriching stimuli – such as new smells, textures, toys and environments which offer them unique experiences without overwhelming them. As they say, leave the party while you’re still having fun. Making sure your cat is not overstimulated so they are ready to play next time.Keep the benefits in mind
While fun is the most important of the play process, purposeful interaction can also relieve stress, as well as help build and maintain your cat’s muscle tone. Toys are an important part of the process, especially those which simulate the experience of hunting in the wild. This includes toys which encourage them to chase and catch.Try to socialise your cat
Playing with other cats or pets can also be great for your cat’s well-being – but only if they’re up for it. Getting your cat to socialise can be difficult at first, and patience is key. Kittens generally have an easier time interacting with other cats. For adult cats used to living alone, a new playmate may take time to get used to. Make sure your cat doesn’t feel forced to interact, and keep eating and litter box spaces separate.Keep your cat’s age and physical health in mind
As your cat gets older, their ability and interest in certain kinds of play will wane. If they are less agile and active than they used to be, toys which require them to pounce, or cat trees may not be appropriate. Give your cat a safe space (potentially even on your lap) where they can stretch out and play without overexerting themselves.Play nice
Behaviours like pouncing, chasing and hiding are perfectly normal for cats, and your cat is generally not trying to be aggressive. If your cat tries to scratch or bite you, stop whatever play you were engaging in and try something else – it’s important not to encourage bad behaviour.


Bedtime for you doesn’t always mean bedtime for your cat. Cats are naturally nocturnal, so just as we are about to hit the hay, they are ready to come alive.

Cats tend to do much of their napping during the day, sleeping for as long as four to five hours at one time – and this may be repeated throughout the day (what a life). As a result, being active at night and exploring your furniture (and curtains) is perfectly natural. This kind of behaviour doesn’t mean your cat is ‘acting out’ or deliberately trying to deprive you of sleep – he’s just being a cat.

However, if this behaviour is disruptive or destructive to the home (and your happiness), there are some steps you can take to bring their natural rhythm more in line with your own.Get active
One of the things you can do is make sure your cat is more active during the day. Engaging toys, scratching posts, and outdoor spaces provide a world of possibilities for your cat to get active.

Alternatively, spend some time engaging in purposeful play with your cat after supper, just before bed – as this will help them release some of that pent up energy and exercise their brain and body. The best case scenario is to try mimic your cat’s natural cycle – which is to eat, clean themselves and then sleep. As a result, it’s also important not to feed your cat too late, as this will give them the extra boost of energy that sees them running around while you try to get some sleep.

 


Like people, cats have different interests, personalities and bad habits.

In the case of stealing, some cats will nip anything they can get their paws on – with some even hoarding their treasures in a special place. There are a number of reasons why cats might steal, and not all of them are negative.

Attention seeking
The primary reason for cats stealing is that at one point or another, the behaviour got them attention. This is not to say they’re necessarily crying out for attention, but they know that it’s a sure-fire way to either get a laugh or a frustrated sigh. Either way, the fuss created by the stealing may encourage your cat to continue doing this.

In this case, it’s best to ignore the behaviour and simply retrieve the object and put it back in its place. In the case of food, making it less accessible or covering it without admonishing your cat is a smart, non-attentive way of showing your cat that you know about their behaviour but will not acknowledge or praise it.Just a bit of fun
For other cats, particularly kittens, stealing is seen as a form of play. The process of stealing (especially food) is used to simulate their natural instinct to stalk, pounce and eat their prey. It’s important to provide other avenues and objects to get this response.

Make sure your cat has access to toys and balls of different sizes, colours and textures.

These will take their attention away from stealing everyday objects around the house. Use these toys to play with your cat, so that they get the necessary stimulation and attention from you.Creating comfort
The third possibility is that your cat’s stealing behaviour is a stress management tactic. Stealing things can be an attempt to get your attention, and get you to inject more play time in your day – cats are sensitive to your work life balance. Particularly if your cat is stealing useless objects and hoarding them, this might be happening in an attempt to create a sense of comfort or familiarity in an uncomfortable or unfamiliar situation. In this case, particularly if the behaviour is being compulsive, urgently reach out to your cat’s vet or look into seeing a cat behaviourist.


We’ve all heard it from cat owners, seen it in movies and experienced it for ourselves – cats hate water. Right? Not always. For some cats, a flowing tap, emptying bath or even a swimming pool is their idea of a fun place to be.

Cats don’t necessarily respond to water in the same way dogs do. While your pet pup might happily jump in the tub when it’s time for a bath, it’s unlikely your cat will do the same. Any cat with an attraction to water interacts with it on their terms only.Natural instinct
Most of their seemingly unusual behaviors are a response to the way cats would otherwise interact with water in nature – at a trickling stream, or from rain droplets falling off a tree, or even in some cases, a voluntary dip in a shallow pond. This is particularly the case for cats crossed with Bengal, Maine Coon or Turkish Van varieties, where genetics have kept the interest in water intact, due to proximity to water in their wild habitats.

It’s important that you don’t discourage your cat from interacting with water if they want to, as this will start to create a negative association. Similarly, a cat who is happy to linger near the pool, or even sip from a garden rock pool does not want to be dunked in a bath whenever it is suitable for you.Don’t push it
Most cats, even those with an attraction to water, prefer not to be fully immersed, which is why your playful cat might only appear interested in the bath while it is been drained.

Similarly, cats hate being sprayed with water, because of the sheer shock of it. As a result, the use of a light spray of water from a water bottle is often used as a training technique – particularly for preventing against scratching of furniture or fighting. This technique should only be used to gently discourage, and not to punish, especially if your cat has an otherwise positive, happy relationship with water. Trust us, you’re the lucky ones.


We’re thrilled to have launched PAMPER Dry food in-store, and we can’t wait for your cat to try it (that’s if they haven’t got their paws on it already). However, whoever said change is as good as a holiday, never tried to change a cat’s dietary habits. We know how fussy cats can be and how sensitive they are to the slightest changes in their routine. That’s why the experts at MARTIN&MARTIN have been working around the clock to ensure a smooth transition as FRISKIES changes to PAMPER in-store. With a new locally-based manufacturing process, we have made every effort to try and match the dry food flavor profile as closely as possible along with some necessary tweaks to the recipe. This is all to ensure your cat stays happy, healthy and falls in love with the new food. Here’s are our tips on how to make the transition from FRISKIES to PAMPER as smooth as possible for your fussy feline: Take it slow – change can take time
A gradual transition will make things easier for your cat. Over a seven-day period, slowly decrease the amount of FRISKIES food in their bowl while increasing the amount of PAMPER. The first day should be purely FRISKIES, and then the second day, mix in a little bit of PAMPER into their bowl. By day four and five, the products should be in similar quantities, and by the end of the week, your cat should be feeling comfortable eating a full bowl of PAMPER. Get hands on with the transition
Consider hand-feeding your cat some PAMPER dry food, at least initially. Cats are likely to trust what you feed them directly, so whoever is doing the hand-feeding must have a good relationship with your cat. Be careful not to feed your cat too much at a time, as the sheer amount can be a turn off. The process may take some time for fussy eaters, but it will be worth it. Worrying about your cat’s favorite FRISKIES pouches? Don’t. The recipe is staying exactly the same and the only thing changing is the name on the packaging.


You’ve probably noticed our transition from FRISKIES to PAMPER on the shelves in store. Should you be concerned? No. Should you be excited? Definitely. And we’re sure your cats will be too. So, why the name change?
FRISKIES has recently joined the MARTIN&MARTIN brand stable, and as a result, it now forms part of the growing PAMPER range of cat food products. We were in fact forced to change from FRISKIES to PAMPER due to not being able to import the product because of new regulatory requirements by the South African government. While this chapter comes with some changes, it also comes with a host of benefits. What this means for the dry food range
Our dry food product is now 100% locally sourced, manufactured and distributed. FRISKIES dry food was previously imported into South Africa from the United States. Now, as PAMPER dry food, we have much more control over the process that goes into making the food for local kitty consumers. This has however meant that the dry food recipe and manufacturing process has changed a little – which is why you may notice slight changes in color and texture, and your cat may need a little time to get used to the new South African flavor. What’s changed?
In South Africa, we have slightly different manufacturing processes to our American counterparts. The maize varieties available are also different and have an impact on the final product. The local varieties which were carefully chosen to ensure consistency in nutritional value and quality – without impacting price. MARTIN&MARTIN and PAMPER have taken every detail into account and worked with various experts to match the flavor profile of the new dry food as closely as possible to the old FRISKIES product. The new food has undergone stringent testing – and taste-testing by a large number of cats – and an expert vet was consulted to ensure it’s as nutritional and flavorful as ever. What about wet food?
FRISKIES wet food pouches have always been produced in South Africa, so this recipe has stayed exactly the same. The only change you’ll be seeing in store is the new name on the packaging. One of the best parts of FRICKIES joining the PAMPER family is the availability of the classic PAMPER canned food product, which has been a favorite with South African cats for years. So the range of options available to your cat within the PAMPER brand has now just expanded. What does this mean for my pocket?
The PAMPER transition has been focused on providing the best product for Friskies fans, and we have made sure that the price has not changed. We are focused on providing the best quality range of products, which are purrfect for pet and owner alike. Still have questions? Don’t hesitate to reach out. Simply visit our contact page to share any queries, compliments or concerns.  


While a kitten’s gentle nibbles may seem cute at first, biting can turn into a seriously bad habit. In kittens, biting is learned from playing and interacting with others in the litter. In this case, the idea is not to hurt, but is rather a form of mock sparring or play-hunting that helps kittens bond with their siblings and with their mothers. In the first two weeks to a month, kittens tend to bite very gently, and are unlikely to sink their teeth in unless they feel threatened.

As cats get older, biting is often a sign of fear or anger. It’s important not to tease your cat, or encourage them to retaliate, as this is more threatening and irritating than fun. It will make them use biting to signal a need for space or distance (can you blame them?).Don’t engage
Play-fighting (without the use of toys) only encourages your cat to engage with you aggressively. If a cat bites your hand or foot, it’s best not to engage. This deters them from thinking you’ll engage in games which involve biting. One of the best ways to do this is to stop touching your cat immediately if they bite you. Just walk away and remove eye contact.When they’re too rough, tell them
Another tactic is to say ‘Ouch!’ loudly whenever your cat bites you (even if it isn’t sore). When cats play with each other and one of them cries out, it signals that the play has gotten too rough. So by vocalizing when your cat hurts you, you can help them learn the difference between play and too-rough-play.

Under absolutely no circumstances should you ever retaliate to a bite with physical punishment – this will only make your cat scared of you and the biting will continue as a form of self-defense.Toy tactics
When playing with your cat, always use a toy instead of your feet or hands. Toys can be great wrestling partners for cats and are a great alternative for them to redirect their extra energy toward. Cats that don’t have other cats to play with can benefit from having a stuffed animal close to their own size as a ‘play mate’.Is something wrong?
If biting or aggression are new behaviours for your cat, this could be indicative of another underlying issue such a physical pain or discomfort. Generally, this kind of troubled biting is accompanied by low growling, flattening of the ears and in serious cases, even some hissing. If you’re worried, take your cat to the vet to have them assessed, in case something is seriously wrong.


It’s an old myth that cats can’t be trained to walk on a leash. Not only is it very possible, and comfortable (if approached correctly), it opens a new set of opportunities for your cat to get active, and spend quality time with you in a safe, controlled way.

Here are five steps to help you start training your cat to walk on a leash:

1. Make sure your cat is comfortable
The most important part of the training process is getting your cat used to the harness. Placing the harness somewhere visible is key – so that your cat can observe it, examine it and play with it.

It’s best to keep the leash around the house for a few days so when you attempt to put it on, your cat is already used to it. It is best to try putting the harness on just before mealtime, or when you offer your cat a treat, to create a positive association.2. Take it slow
Don’t try and attach a leash to the harness in the first few days. Only once your cat is fully comfortable walking around with the harness on, attach the leash and let your cat walk around the house as usual. At this point, hold the leash loosely and let your cat walk around with you behind them for short periods (don’t push it!).3. Praise your cat for progress
When your cat seems comfortable with the leash, start to practice walking together. Place your cat down in one spot and slowly walk to the end of the leash. If they start to follow you, reward them with a treat.

If they don’t respond, pull extremely gently on the leash and wait patiently for your cat to start following. Every time your cat follows you, stop to reward them with some stroking, and a treat if necessary.

This process can be a long one, so just have patience – and lots of treats.4. Practice consistently
Before you consider taking your cat for a walk, practice consistently indoors, and gradually move to the garden or outside area. Keep repeating the process, extending the distance bit by bit. Make sure your cat is not tired, hungry or irritable when you attempt a practice session, as they will lose interest and start to view walks as a chore rather than a fun, bonding experience.5. Time to head outdoors
If you’re sure your cat is comfortable walking on a leash, try taking them beyond the house and garden. At first, there may be some hesitation as you head into uncharted territory, and your cat might seem uneasy or distracted so it’s very important to be patient and give them the time they need to feel comfortable.

Start your walks in a quiet area where your cat can explore without feeling rushed or threatened by anything around them. While they may never be as obedient on walks as dogs, walking your cat can be a great bonding experience – and a safe, supervised adventure for cats who spend most of their time indoors.


We all know cats like to take the lead on keeping themselves clean, but that’s not always the case when it comes to their teeth. Like humans, cats have very sensitive mouths, and looking after oral health is very important to their overall well-being. Diet plays a big role in the health of your cat’s teeth. Dry and crunchy foods, like PAMPER's dry foods, help to keep their teeth clean. While your cat is chewing, the particles and friction from the dry food scrape against the surface of the teeth – just like a human’s toothbrush. Something’s fishy…
While dry food takes care of every day dental health, there are some signs your cat may need a little extra help. While it’s normal for your cat to have slightly fishy-smelling breath, seriously foul breath is cause for concern. Another red flag is any evidence of drooling. While this is reasonably common in dogs, in cats it can indicate a gum ailment. Regular cleaning
One of the ways to prevent problems with oral health is to take more regular care of your cat’s teeth. It’s important to get your cat into the habit of having their teeth cleaned from when they are kittens, as older cats can be particularly resistant (to put it lightly). Ideally, cats should have their teeth cleaned twice-weekly to help prevent dangerous and painful dental diseases. It also ensures any small issues don’t become serious because they’ve been left unattended. Get started
The best place to start is to consult your vet and ask for a demonstration on how to clean your cats’ teeth safely. If your cat resists, hisses or bites when you attempt to clean their pearly whites, it is best to schedule in regular sessions with the vet and leave it to the professionals


Taking on a cat as a fur kid and companion is not always easy. Cats can be very strong-willed about their needs, and it’s important as a cat owner to prioritize their well being over their preferences – and demands.

Where health is concerned, ignoring your cat’s weight problem is never an option. A cute, fat cat may be nice to look at and cuddle, but in the long term, overweight or obese cats can suffer physically, mentally and emotionally.

How do I know if my cat is overweight?
One of the first signs that your cat has a weight problem is not being able to feel their ribs. Additionally, if your cat struggles to walk or run, or is unusually sluggish, these may be indicators that their weight is already taking its toll.

Obesity in cats can make everyday activities more difficult and less enjoyable, and ultimately shorten their lifespan. Diabetes, an under performing immune system and problems with digestion also come with the territory – but can be avoided with a switch to a healthier diet for your cat. Remember, you are in control of this.What can I do about my cat’s weight?
If your cat has put on a lot of weight, or has begun to display the above symptoms, the first step is to lower their calorie intake. This can be achieved by switching to a lower-calorie cat food, offering smaller portions of dry or wet food during the day, and if you feel you need more support, approaching your vet for a specific weight management program.

Every cat’s needs are different, and depending on the severity of the situation, and the causes, your vet’s involvement will be crucial to providing a long-term diet plan which protects the health, well-being and happiness of your cat.


Playtime is some of the best bonding time with your cat. Even better if it is done with a purpose and helps to keep your cat’s body and mind healthy. Each cat has different needs and preferences when it comes to play. Here we break down five guiding principles for purposeful play:

Know your cat’s limits
Play is meant to be fun – and while it may be tempting to get out the cat training book and try to teach your kitty some tricks, the main point is always enjoyment.

Introduce a variety of enriching stimuli – such as new smells, textures, toys and environments which offer them unique experiences without overwhelming them. As they say, leave the party while you’re still having fun. Making sure your cat is not overstimulated so they are ready to play next time.Keep the benefits in mind
While fun is the most important of the play process, purposeful interaction can also relieve stress, as well as help build and maintain your cat’s muscle tone. Toys are an important part of the process, especially those which simulate the experience of hunting in the wild. This includes toys which encourage them to chase and catch.Try to socialize your cat
Playing with other cats or pets can also be great for your cat’s well-being – but only if they’re up for it. Getting your cat to socialize can be difficult at first, and patience is key. Kittens generally have an easier time interacting with other cats. For adult cats used to living alone, a new playmate may take time to get used to. Make sure your cat doesn’t feel forced to interact, and keep eating and litter box spaces separate.Keep your cat’s age and physical health in mind
As your cat gets older, their ability and interest in certain kinds of play will wane. If they are less agile and active than they used to be, toys which require them to pounce, or cat trees may not be appropriate. Give your cat a safe space (potentially even on your lap) where they can stretch out and play without overexerting themselves.Play nice
Behaviors like pouncing, chasing and hiding are perfectly normal for cats, and your cat is generally not trying to be aggressive. If your cat tries to scratch or bite you, stop whatever play you were engaging in and try something else – it’s important not to encourage bad behavior.


In recent years, the pet supplement industry has boomed – with a range of product options claiming to support different functions. However, these should be approached with care and a very specific understanding of your cat’s needs.
Most cats receive all the nutrition they need from eating a complete and balanced diet.
Most complex cat foods, which have been developed to meet their dietary needs offer complete nutrition. Moreover, cat foods developed specifically for kittens, adult cats and mature cats, are designed to ensure your cat receives the correct nutrition for their age and physical needs. As a result, the addition of a vitamin or supplement without consultation with a vet, could actually result in toxicity. If your cat has certain health issues, or gets sick easily and often, it may be time to speak to your cat’s vet about whether supplements (or other supportive treatments) could help.  


Despite their often sedentary behaviour, cats need regular mental stimulation and exercise – both of which they get through play. Here are four feline-friendly games to try at home:

1. Chase the prey
As domesticated as our fur friends are, they still like to feel like they’re in the wild sometimes. The idea with this game is to simulate the way prey would move – by dragging a toy across the ground and like any prey would, pausing periodically. This will stimulate a response in your cat to stalk the toy and pounce on the unsuspecting squeaky toy.

To maintain the excitement – don’t leave the toy lying around after a play session. If your cat sees it too often, the mystery will be lost and they will consider it an everyday object instead of one worth playing with.2. Catnip fun
Ah, catnip – your cat’s favorite herb. Like all things, cat nip should be used in moderation, but it can illicit  serious interest from your cat. Whether you put a little catnip into a toy or ball, or buy one ready made, it’s a good way to get cats interested in regular play.

This is particularly the case when trying to get more sluggish cats off the couch and into a playful mood. If your cat is not responding, do not add more – it’s important to remember that catnip doesn’t do it for all cats.3. Fetch – for cats
Yes, this classic game is not just reserved for dogs. Cats love to play fetch too, and while they might not return the ball, most cats will run after and try to catch a ball that you’ve thrown.

Cats especially love it when there are rattling beads or a bell inside the ball, as this helps keep their attention. Like the ‘chase the prey’ game, fetch simulates the experience of trying to catch something in the wild. It’s important to throw the ball at a reasonable distance, and not to aim it anywhere where it might be difficult or dangerous for your cat to ‘fetch’.4. Play with your food
A little more high-tech, this game involves getting your cat a puzzle feeder or food distributor. These are toys which hold a little serving of food in a compartment, only releasing it when the toy is rolled, pressed or pounced on.

This game helps your cat feel like they’re hunting for food. It also encourages inactive cats, who need more of an incentive to get playful. Keep in mind your cat’s daily food limit, and don’t let them use the toy to overindulge.


There are few things more exciting than extending your family (or furmily) with a new fur kid. It’s a chance to provide some company for your existing cat, and bring new energy into the home. But the process takes some time, and it’s important to keep a few things in mind if you want a happy, harmonious relationship between your cats.

Get the right personality
The first thing to consider is choosing the right cat to add to your family. If you’ve already got a particularly sedentary cat, it’s best not to get an overly playful cat, who may potentially frustrate or even irritate your more relaxed cat.

Similarly, if you have an older or more temperamental cat, a kitten with boundless energy may present a source of anger or aggression from your cat, who has clearly established your home as their territory. While the cats don’t have to be the same age or have the exact same personality traits, it’s important to think about your cat’s well being and preferences as much as your own.Ground rules
When bringing your new cat into the home, the next consideration is space. Cats are naturally territorial, so it will be important for your existing cat to feel that their territory has not been invaded, and at the same time, it’s important for your new cat to get to know your space.

Establish clearly demarcated spaces for eating and sleeping, and a clear separation of litter boxes, to minimize clashes at mealtimes and bathroom breaks. For most cats, being separated entirely might be best, with the new cat (particularly if it is a kitten) best kept in a separate room. One technique used by cat behaviorists is bringing each cat to either side of the door, so that they can smell each other, communicate, with the safety of the door separating them.

Your cats may well start to eat or sleep together over time, but it’s important to let them come to that decision on their own, instead of being forced into it.Supervised play
When it comes to play, this is where the relationship can be make or break. Cats have different personalities, approaches and habits when it comes to play, so it will be important to make sure that play is initially supervised.

Gentle interaction and play will also give your cats a chance to get used to each other’s scents, which is a key part of their bonding process. However, this must not be rushed. Before you allow your cats the opportunity to meet, giving each cat a towel with the other cat’s scent is a more passive way to create familiarity.

In the cases where your cats display signs or anxiety, aggression or violence, it may be necessary to take them both to a cat behaviorist who can intervene on a more skilled level, and suggest more techniques for their interaction.


Seeing your cat ill is one of the worst feelings in the world, and when they’re vomiting it’s even worse. While vomiting can sometimes be a somewhat natural response to discomfort, it can also signal something more serious.Hairballs
The most common reason for cats vomiting is that they are trying to get rid of hairballs. This is reasonably uncommon in short-haired cats, but is likely to happen now and then with long-haired breeds. While this is not necessarily dangerous, it’s important to check that it’s not happening too often, or that your cat is choking when this happens.Speedy eaters
Another common reason, which applies to all kinds of cats, is that they are eating too quickly. It is important for your cats to eat at a steady pace, in order to avoid swallowing their kibble whole, which can induce gagging and vomiting.

In this case, a larger, rather than smaller kibble is a better choice so that your cat is forced to slow down, chew for longer and then swallow. Another option is to feed your cat more often, in smaller portions. Make sure that if you have more than one cat, there is the option for separate bowls in separate areas, as the desperation to get food from one bowl can cause this frantic, fast eating.

What about grass?
One peculiar behaviour you may have noticed is your cat occasionally eating grass and then vomiting it up. This is also reasonably natural, despite the fact that it looks uncomfortable.

Cats don’t have the stomach enzymes to digest grass, so they eat it to clear their digestive tract of hair, bones and parasites, which are released when they vomit. However, this behaviour can also signal a serious stomach irritation or infection, so if the behaviour becomes more frequent, or you notice blood in your cat’s vomit (for this or any other reason), seek help from your cat’s vet as soon as possible.


Diabetes is a serious medical condition which, like in the case of humans, can seriously affect your cat’s quality of life. Simply put – diabetes is a condition caused by a lack, or deficiency of insulin, which is the hormone which regulates how sugar is used in the body. The biggest issue when it comes to feline diabetes is that sugar is not properly absorbed into the cells and tissues in the body. Particularly if your cat is a regular eater, who maintains a stable weight, the presence of diabetes is often marked by significant weight loss – even though your cat is eating and drinking the same amount. Increased urination is also a tell-tale sign.
It’s important to make sure you have a plan, and the resources to look after your cat with diabetes. After the initial diagnosis, your cat will require regular visits to the vets, as well as treatment to address their insulin absorption. This treatment will come in the form of one to two insulin injections per day, which are administered under your cat’s skin. While you may be a little squeamish, and wary of hurting your cat – this is vital for their immediate and long term health and the vet will make sure that you are trained as to how to perform the injections correctly. As a general rule, it is important to ensure that your cat has eaten at least half of their allotted portion when the insulin is administered. In most cases, you will not be required to do home blood tests, unless directed by your vet. If you are, a helpful tool to invest in is a blood glucose monitor, which requires a tiny sample of your cat’s blood to check their glucose levels. Most cats who have a healthy diet, adequate access to healthcare and treatment have a positive prognosis and can even go into partial remission. However, it’s important to monitor your cat’s water intake, eating habits and ensure that they are engaging in regular exercise. If you believe your cat may have diabetes, please seek the advice of a vet urgently.


Whether you’ve just taken home your first precious kitten, or you’ve always owned cats, it’s important to make sure you’re ticking off all their needs. As we all know, cats are complex animals and keeping them content isn’t always easy. Here’s a basic guide to the essentials when it comes to looking after their physical, mental and emotional well being: Make playtime mandatory
Make time each day to play with your cat. Stimulation is very important for cats, especially when they are young and developing. Cats are hard-wired to hunt, eat, clean and sleep. Playing helps to channel those hunting instincts and is an important part of your cat’s health and quality of life. Invest in some toys and play with them every day. Provide a scratch pad
Cats need to sharpen their claws. So it’s up to you whether they do this on your furniture (or curtains), or on a designated scratch post or pad. Scratching is an important (and inevitable) exercise for cats and if they get into the habit of scratching their claws on the wrong surfaces, it will be a tricky one to break. If the scratching surface you provide is not being used, it might be uncomfortable or unsuitable for your cat, so try different options. Keep things clean
Look after their litter boxes. Make sure they’re kept in a clean, private area and that the box is emptied once a day. As a general rule, you should always have one more litter box than you have cats to ensure they can always find a clean, quiet place to do their business. Also – remember cats are extremely proud animals. They don’t like to be watched while in a compromising position in the litter box, so make sure you give them enough privacy. Handle with care
Picking up an adult cat by the scruff of the neck is a big no-no. When cats are very young, their mothers often pick them up and carry them this way, but as cats get older and heavier, this can be damaging. Picking your cat up by the scruff should only be done in emergency situations, for very short periods – and always support their rump. Rather pick up your cat with both hands – one hand holding the cat under the chest, just behind their front legs. Use your other hand to support the back legs and bottom. But remember, sometimes cats just don’t want to be picked up, so always read their mood and don’t force anything. Don’t string them along
We’ve all seen depictions of cats playing with and chewing on string or yarn. This can actually be a choking hazard and is very dangerous. If swallowed, it can make your cat quite sick – causing blockages in the stomach and serious digestive problems. So keep your sewing and knitting safely packed away, out of reach, and invest in safe toys. Risky business
While cats are incredibly agile and adventurous, they shouldn’t be encouraged to test the limits. If you live in an apartment at or above second floor level, keep windows closed or fit a screen or gate over them.


Training your cat may seem like an impossible task. After all, it’s not often you hear cat owners asking their cats to sit, heel or roll over. While your cat will almost never respond like a dog, some vets and animal behaviorists believe your strong-willed kitty can be trained to do some things – and one of the most effective training tools is a clicker.

A clicker device clicks audibly when pressed, and can be used to create associations with a wide range of tasks, that your cat can learn over time.

If you’re going to use a clicker, it’s important that your cat gets used to the sound of it before you attempt any specific training techniques, click the device and wait for the sound to catch your cat’s attention.

Once you’re sure the cat recognizes the sound and that it is coming from the clicker in your hand, reward your cat with praise and a small treat. Repeat this process consistently to build a positive relationship between the clicker and your cat’s positive response to it.

Once that relationship has been established, the reward can slowly be removed from the process and the clicker will be enough of a reward. At this point, start to associate the clicker (and different clicks) with different commands.

For example, if you call your cat to ‘come,’ and they do, click the clicker.

This will set the tone for associating the command with the clicker and the process of coming towards you.

You can also use this for mealtimes, or for getting your cat to come outside with you.This can also be used in tandem with your cat’s name – which research says they know, but choose to ignore.

Inevitably you may find that the clicker may not even be necessary if your cat begins to answer to their name, but it can be an important support for getting your cat’s attention and their understanding that you require something from them.

If you’re struggling to get into the swing of using the clicker, consult a cat behaviorist for some tips that work for your cat and his or her unique personality.

 


It’s an old myth that cats can’t be trained to walk on a leash. Not only is it very possible, and comfortable (if approached correctly), it opens a new set of opportunities for your cat to get active, and spend quality time with you in a safe, controlled way. Here are five steps to help you start training your cat to walk on a leash: 1. Make sure your cat is comfortable
The most important part of the training process is getting your cat used to the harness. Placing the harness somewhere visible is key – so that your cat can observe it, examine it and play with it. It’s best to keep the leash around the house for a few days so when you attempt to put it on, your cat is already used to it. It is best to try putting the harness on just before mealtime, or when you offer your cat a treat, to create a positive association. 2. Take it slow
Don’t try and attach a leash to the harness in the first few days. Only once your cat is fully comfortable walking around with the harness on, attach the leash and let your cat walk around the house as usual. At this point, hold the leash loosely and let your cat walk around with you behind them for short periods (don’t push it!).   3. Praise your cat for progress
When your cat seems comfortable with the leash, start to practice walking together. Place your cat down in one spot and slowly walk to the end of the leash. If they start to follow you, reward them with a treat. If they don’t respond, pull extremely gently on the leash and wait patiently for your cat to start following. Every time your cat follows you, stop to reward them with some stroking, and a treat if necessary. This process can be a long one, so just have patience – and lots of treats. 4. Practice consistently
Before you consider taking your cat for a walk, practice consistently indoors, and gradually move to the garden or outside area. Keep repeating the process, extending the distance bit by bit. Make sure your cat is not tired, hungry or irritable when you attempt a practice session, as they will lose interest and start to view walks as a chore rather than a fun, bonding experience. 5. Time to head outdoors
If you’re sure your cat is comfortable walking on a leash, try taking them beyond the house and garden. At first, there may be some hesitation as you head into uncharted territory, and your cat might seem uneasy or distracted so it’s very important to be patient and give them the time they need to feel comfortable. Start your walks in a quiet area where your cat can explore without feeling rushed or threatened by anything around them. While they may never be as obedient on walks as dogs, walking your cat can be a great bonding experience – and a safe, supervised adventure for cats who spend most of their time indoors.


While a kitten’s gentle nibbles may seem cute at first, biting can turn into a seriously bad habit. In kittens, biting is learned from playing and interacting with others in the litter. In this case, the idea is not to hurt, but is rather a form of mock sparring or play-hunting that helps kittens bond with their siblings and with their mothers. In the first two weeks to a month, kittens tend to bite very gently, and are unlikely to sink their teeth in unless they feel threatened. As cats get older, biting is often a sign of fear or anger. It’s important not to tease your cat, or encourage them to retaliate, as this is more threatening and irritating than fun. It will make them use biting to signal a need for space or distance (can you blame them?). Don’t engage Play-fighting (without the use of toys) only encourages your cat to engage with you aggressively. If a cat bites your hand or foot, it’s best not to engage. This deters them from thinking you’ll engage in games which involve biting. One of the best ways to do this is to stop touching your cat immediately if they bite you. Just walk away and remove eye contact.When they’re too rough, tell them Another tactic is to say ‘Ouch!’ loudly whenever your cat bites you (even if it isn’t sore). When cats play with each other and one of them cries out, it signals that the play has gotten too rough. So by vocalizing when your cat hurts you, you can help them learn the difference between play and too-rough-play. Under absolutely no circumstances should you ever retaliate to a bite with physical punishment – this will only make your cat scared of you and the biting will continue as a form of self-defense.Toy tactics When playing with your cat, always use a toy instead of your feet or hands. Toys can be great wrestling partners for cats and are a great alternative for them to redirect their extra energy toward. Cats that don’t have other cats to play with can benefit from having a stuffed animal close to their own size as a ‘play mate’.Is something wrong? If biting or aggression are new behaviours for your cat, this could be indicative of another underlying issue such a physical pain or discomfort. Generally, this kind of troubled biting is accompanied by low growling, flattening of the ears and in serious cases, even some hissing. If you’re worried, take your cat to the vet to have them assessed, in case something is seriously wrong.


Every cat is different, but you can learn a lot about their mood by paying close attention to their body language. From a fuzzy raised tail, to subtle twitching of the ears, these signs are more than just unique personality traits – they’re essential ways in which our cats communicate with us, and each other. While cats can’t always be predictable (they love to keep an air of mystery), here’s a basic guide to what your cat’s body language is telling you: Friendly
A friendly cat demonstrates its mood with alert, blinking eyes and ears pointed forward. While meowing can be a complaint or demand (for an extra helping of PAMPER), most of the time, intermittent meowing is a sign that your cat wants to communicate with you. Spread out whiskers and gentle nuzzling is also a sign that your cat is looking to spend some quality time with their favorite human. Unhappy/Uncomfortable
We all know cats can be fussy, and sometimes even diva-like, but it is essential that we read and respect their body language. When your cat is unhappy, they are not interested in any kind of contact, and may even hiss or growl at you. Cats do not want to be picked up when they are in a bad mood, and will sometimes arch their back and the hair on their back and tail will be raised. This is a sign of irritation and is often accompanied by slightly dilated pupils and flattened eyes. Some cats exhibit the same behaviour when they are sick or hurt. If your cat is acting uncharacteristically for an extended period of time, consult your vet. Relaxed
Besides being stretched out in a sunny patch, there are a few clues which can help you tell if your cat is relaxed. In addition to relaxed, pointed down ears, cats also tend to make their tails visible. While a curled up position may sometimes indicate fear, a relaxed cat is likely to allow you to approach them, with whiskers fanned out instead of being pulled back. If your cat shows you it’s belly, consider this the ultimate compliment. Cats’ natural instincts tell them to always keep their tummies protected, so if they’re sleeping belly-up or rolling on the floor in front of you, they are completely relaxed and trusting in your presence. (Tip: As tempting as it may be – it’s not always a good idea to go in for a tummy rub. Those instincts are strong, and could get you a swift swipe or even a bite.) Scared
Anything from an encounter with another cat, to a loud noise or an unfamiliar environment can make for one very fearful cat. While a scared cat may not always show its fear overtly, there are subtle clues. They are particularly sensitive to noise or sudden movements, and are likely to avoid you, even if they are generally quite open or loving. Dilated pupils and flattened ears are also tell-tale signs, with your cat’s tail pressed close to their body. Playful
This is by far the best mood for your cat to be in. Rolling side to side, stretched out on their back or pawing at you gently, these are clear behavioral signs that your cat is keen for a little tumble. This is the ideal moment to bring out a cat toy – or that red laser light.


There’s nothing worse than coming home to a puddle of cat pee (or worse), next to, instead of inside the litter box. And when it starts to become a habit, it can be a sign that your cat has rejected the litter box entirely. Why would my cat to reject the litter box?
Cats are fussy beings, and there are a range of reasons as to why your cat won’t go like they used to. One of the primary reasons is cleanliness. If your cat doesn’t believe the litter, the box, or the spot you’ve placed it in, is not up to their standards, they will not use it. This is not the case for all cats though. Particularly where older cats or tiny kittens are concerned, it could be that the box is too difficult to climb into, or that the type of litter used does not suit their sensitive paws. Anxiety, stress or illness can also be contributing factors. Cats who are uncomfortable often change their habits to signal their discomfort to their owners. Keep it clean
If your cat is concerned about cleanliness, make sure that the litter box is thoroughly cleaned and changed out more frequently. Remove soiled litter at least once a day and wash the entire box at least once a week. Ideally, a natural smelling cleaner should be used, and ammonia-based cleaner should be avoided, because of how similar it smells to cat urine. Give them more options
Invest in more litter boxes. A useful rule of thumb is to get one more litter box than you have cats. If you have one cat, get two litter boxes, if you have two cats, get three. This allows you to swap out the boxes more easily, and avoid cats showing up to a litter box that has already been used by another. Easy access and privacy
Creating a sense of privacy is also key. Cats don’t like to be seen visiting the loo (it’s too undignified). In the case of older cats, it may be time to switch to a shallower option. Look for a litter box that is very easy for your cat to climb into, and place it in an area which is easily accessible from all sides When to consult a vet
If you suspect that anxiety or physical illness might be a cause, consult a vet to discuss your cat’s behaviour. More frequent urination, urinating outside the litter box, or any signs of strain when urinating can be signs of a urinary tract infection, which will need to be seen to in order to alleviate any pain or discomfort.


Whether it’s an open suitcase, an old box, your brand new black shirt or your open laptop, cats seem to have a habit of sitting in or on whatever they can find. Why does my cat like to sit inside things?
It’s all down to basic instincts. Most cats are looking for somewhere to hide when they sit in things. While your little house cat may never have experienced the wild, they are responding to a species-specific desire to see their environment and potential prey, without being seen. Think inside the box
Allowing your cat to find new places to sit actually enhances their enjoyment of their home life. There’s no need to invest in expensive ‘cat caves’ – any old box will do. Even better – hide a toy in the box for your cat to find. What about electronics?
This one has nothing to do with animal instincts. Instead, cats often sit on electronics like laptops, gaming consoles and keyboards for their warmth (just like the hood of your car). For some cats, it’s also about the images on the screen, which they find stimulating – even though they don’t receive the image and information in the same way humans do. If your cat sits on an electronic device you’re busy using, that’s less about the warmth and more about getting your attention. Make sure there are no dangling or exposed wires (and definitely don’t let them bite into them) so there’s no danger of your cat hurting themselves. As for them sitting on your clothes… invest in a lint roller.


Bedtime for you doesn’t always mean bedtime for your cat. Cats are naturally nocturnal, so just as we are about to hit the hay, they are ready to come alive.

Cats tend to do much of their napping during the day, sleeping for as long as four to five hours at one time – and this may be repeated throughout the day (what a life). As a result, being active at night and exploring your furniture (and curtains) is perfectly natural. This kind of behaviour doesn’t mean your cat is ‘acting out’ or deliberately trying to deprive you of sleep – he’s just being a cat.

However, if this behaviour is disruptive or destructive to the home (and your happiness), there are some steps you can take to bring their natural rhythm more in line with your own.

Get active
One of the things you can do is make sure your cat is more active during the day. Engaging toys, scratching posts, and outdoor spaces provide a world of possibilities for your cat to get active.

Alternatively, spend some time engaging in purposeful play with your cat after supper, just before bed – as this will help them release some of that pent up energy and exercise their brain and body. The best case scenario is to try mimic your cat’s natural cycle – which is to eat, clean themselves and then sleep. As a result, it’s also important not to feed your cat too late, as this will give them the extra boost of energy that sees them running around while you try to get some sleep.


Like people, cats have different interests, personalities and bad habits. In the case of stealing, some cats will nip anything they can get their paws on – with some even hoarding their treasures in a special place. There are a number of reasons why cats might steal, and not all of them are negative. Attention seeking
The primary reason for cats stealing is that at one point or another, the behaviour got them attention. This is not to say they’re necessarily crying out for attention, but they know that it’s a sure-fire way to either get a laugh or a frustrated sigh. Either way, the fuss created by the stealing may encourage your cat to continue doing this. In this case, it’s best to ignore the behaviour and simply retrieve the object and put it back in its place. In the case of food, making it less accessible or covering it without admonishing your cat is a smart, non-attentive way of showing your cat that you know about their behaviour but will not acknowledge or praise it. Just a bit of fun
For other cats, particularly kittens, stealing is seen as a form of play. The process of stealing (especially food) is used to simulate their natural instinct to stalk, pounce and eat their prey. It’s important to provide other avenues and objects to get this response. Make sure your cat has access to toys and balls of different sizes, colours and textures. These will take their attention away from stealing everyday objects around the house. Use these toys to play with your cat, so that they get the necessary stimulation and attention from you. Creating comfort
The third possibility is that your cat’s stealing behaviour is a stress management tactic. Stealing things can be an attempt to get your attention, and get you to inject more play time in your day – cats are sensitive to your work life balance. Particularly if your cat is stealing useless objects and hoarding them, this might be happening in an attempt to create a sense of comfort or familiarity in an uncomfortable or unfamiliar situation. In this case, particularly if the behaviour is being compulsive, urgently reach out to your cat’s vet or look into seeing a cat behaviorist.


There are few things more exciting than extending your family (or furiously) with a new fur kid. It’s a chance to provide some company for your existing cat, and bring new energy into the home. But the process takes some time, and it’s important to keep a few things in mind if you want a happy, harmonious relationship between your cats. Get the right personality
he first thing to consider is choosing the right cat to add to your family. If you’ve already got a particularly sedentary cat, it’s best not to get an overly playful cat, who may potentially frustrate or even irritate your more relaxed cat. Similarly, if you have an older or more temperamental cat, a kitten with boundless energy may present a source of anger or aggression from your cat, who has clearly established your home as their territory. While the cats don’t have to be the same age or have the exact same personality traits, it’s important to think about your cat’s well being and preferences as much as your own. Ground rules
When bringing your new cat into the home, the next consideration is space. Cats are naturally territorial, so it will be important for your existing cat to feel that their territory has not been invaded, and at the same time, it’s important for your new cat to get to know your space. Establish clearly demarcated spaces for eating and sleeping, and a clear separation of litter boxes, to minimize clashes at mealtimes and bathroom breaks. For most cats, being separated entirely might be best, with the new cat (particularly if it is a kitten) best kept in a separate room. One technique used by cat behaviourists is bringing each cat to either side of the door, so that they can smell each other, communicate, with the safety of the door separating them. Your cats may well start to eat or sleep together over time, but it’s important to let them come to that decision on their own, instead of being forced into it. Supervised play
When it comes to play, this is where the relationship can be make or break. Cats have different personalities, approaches and habits when it comes to play, so it will be important to make sure that play is initially supervised. Gentle interaction and play will also give your cats a chance to get used to each other’s scents, which is a key part of their bonding process. However, this must not be rushed. Before you allow your cats the opportunity to meet, giving each cat a towel with the other cat’s scent is a more passive way to create familiarity. In the cases where your cats display signs or anxiety, aggression or violence, it may be necessary to take them both to a cat behaviorist who can intervene on a more skilled level, and suggest more techniques for their interaction.


We’ve all heard it from cat owners, seen it in movies and experienced it for ourselves – cats hate water. Right? Not always. For some cats, a flowing tap, emptying bath or even a swimming pool is their idea of a fun place to be.

Cats don’t necessarily respond to water in the same way dogs do. While your pet pup might happily jump in the tub when it’s time for a bath, it’s unlikely your cat will do the same. Any cat with an attraction to water interacts with it on their terms only.Natural instinct
Most of their seemingly unusual behaviors are a response to the way cats would otherwise interact with water in nature – at a trickling stream, or from rain droplets falling off a tree, or even in some cases, a voluntary dip in a shallow pond. This is particularly the case for cats crossed with Bengal, Maine Coon or Turkish Van varieties, where genetics have kept the interest in water intact, due to proximity to water in their wild habitats.

It’s important that you don’t discourage your cat from interacting with water if they want to, as this will start to create a negative association. Similarly, a cat who is happy to linger near the pool, or even sip from a garden rock pool does not want to be dunked in a bath whenever it is suitable for you.Don’t push it
Most cats, even those with an attraction to water, prefer not to be fully immersed, which is why your playful cat might only appear interested in the bath while it is been drained.

Similarly, cats hate being sprayed with water, because of the sheer shock of it. As a result, the use of a light spray of water from a water bottle is often used as a training technique – particularly for preventing against scratching of furniture or fighting. This technique should only be used to gently discourage, and not to punish, especially if your cat has an otherwise positive, happy relationship with water. Trust us, you’re the lucky ones.


Cats, like people, have different personalities – and a hot temper may just be one of the traits your cat possesses. However, if your cat is unusually aggressive or regularly violent, it’s worth looking a little deeper.

The first thing to establish is whether your cat is indeed being aggressive, or just tends to be a little overzealous. Some cats may hide and pounce, scratch or even nibble at the strangest times. While this can be playful, or a reflection of their instinct to hunt, overly aggressive behaviour should be attended to with the right kind of corrective measures.Don’t encourage it
It is important not to encourage your cat’s aggressive behaviour. Play-fighting with your cat, or encouraging them to do so with other cats and animals sends a signal that you condone this behaviour. Violence begets violence, so any kind of physical reprimand or punishment will generally make your cat more defensive and violent.

Instead, try to channel your cat’s energy and need for physical stimulation in a different direction. Providing hanging toys, jingling balls or chew toys allow your cat to play and pounce, without doing any harm. This takes the emphasis away from hurting and redirects their energy toward stimulation and fun.Can’t we all just get along?
Often, signs of aggression occur in homes with more than one cat or animal. This is partially to do with cats being inherently territorial, single-minded animals, who enjoy their own space, and the freedom to do things their own way.

Encouraging a non-competitive, equally loving environment between cats and/or with other animals in the household is crucial. Any fighting should always be stopped immediately. However, the environment could also be a trigger for this behaviour.

Inadequate food provision (in the same bowl for example) or constantly occupied litter boxes can make for a tense environment, so it is important to look after each animal’s needs individually.Getting territorial
Beyond your home, neighboring cats can also create a trigger for aggressive or violent behaviour as your cat strives to defend its territory. Try to keep other cats off your property, and certainly do not give them access to your home, your cat’s food or litter box. If necessary, discuss this with your neighbor to figure out a solution for the cats involved.Consult an expert
In serious cases of aggression and fighting, the input of a cat behaviorist may be necessary. A history of violence (especially in the case of rescue or stray animals) or temperament issues may need their expert involvement to help your cat react more positively to difficult situations.

 


We all know that sinking feeling. You come home from a long day, only to find that your dearest kitty has gone to town on your couch with their claws. And while it’s tempting to get irritated, scratching is normal, healthy behaviour for your cat.

To keep their claws in tip-top condition, cats need to scratch regularly, but your custom-made curtains should not be the target – and it’s important that your cat knows this. The best thing you can do as an owner is provide suitable alternatives.

The best options are designated scratching pads or posts. These should be introduced into the home as soon as possible, so that your cat learns to use them from an early age.

When you see your cat scratching your furniture, one of the most effective ways to dissuade them is to try squirting them (very gently) with water from a spray bottle.

This action, which should never be done angrily or aggressively, should be accompanied with a firm “no!”. Also, try to cover the item your cat prefers with plastic. Most cats return to the same spot, and the uncomfortable feeling of plastic under their paws should help to dissuade them.

On the other hand, when you see your cat using their scratching pad or post, you should reward them with affection and affirmation. This will help to create negative associations with damaging the furniture and positive associations with using the scratching post to keep their claws sharp.

Ensure you get the right scratching aid for your cat – both in terms of size and height, and their ability to reach it without obstacles.

 


Training your cat may seem like an impossible task. After all, it’s not often you hear cat owners asking their cats to sit, heel or roll over. While your cat will almost never respond like a dog, some vets and animal behaviorists believe your strong-willed kitty can be trained to do some things – and one of the most effective training tools is a clicker.

A clicker device clicks audibly when pressed, and can be used to create associations with a wide range of tasks, that your cat can learn over time.

If you’re going to use a clicker, it’s important that your cat gets used to the sound of it before you attempt any specific training techniques, click the device and wait for the sound to catch your cat’s attention.

Once you’re sure the cat recognizes the sound and that it is coming from the clicker in your hand, reward your cat with praise and a small treat. Repeat this process consistently to build a positive relationship between the clicker and your cat’s positive response to it.

Once that relationship has been established, the reward can slowly be removed from the process and the clicker will be enough of a reward. At this point, start to associate the clicker (and different clicks) with different commands.

For example, if you call your cat to ‘come,’ and they do, click the clicker.

This will set the tone for associating the command with the clicker and the process of coming towards you.

You can also use this for mealtimes, or for getting your cat to come outside with you.This can also be used in tandem with your cat’s name – which research says they know, but choose to ignore.

Inevitably you may find that the clicker may not even be necessary if your cat begins to answer to their name, but it can be an important support for getting your cat’s attention and their understanding that you require something from them.

If you’re struggling to get into the swing of using the clicker, consult a cat behaviourist for some tips that work for your cat and his or her unique personality.


Whether you’ve just taken home your first precious kitten, or you’ve always owned cats, it’s important to make sure you’re ticking off all their needs. As we all know, cats are complex animals and keeping them content isn’t always easy. Here’s a basic guide to the essentials when it comes to looking after their physical, mental and emotional well being: Make playtime mandatory
Make time each day to play with your cat. Stimulation is very important for cats, especially when they are young and developing. Cats are hard-wired to hunt, eat, clean and sleep. Playing helps to channel those hunting instincts and is an important part of your cat’s health and quality of life. Invest in some toys and play with them every day. Provide a scratch pad
Cats need to sharpen their claws. So it’s up to you whether they do this on your furniture (or curtains), or on a designated scratch post or pad. Scratching is an important (and inevitable) exercise for cats and if they get into the habit of scratching their claws on the wrong surfaces, it will be a tricky one to break. If the scratching surface you provide is not being used, it might be uncomfortable or unsuitable for your cat, so try different options. Keep things clean
Look after their litter boxes. Make sure they’re kept in a clean, private area and that the box is emptied once a day. As a general rule, you should always have one more litter box than you have cats to ensure they can always find a clean, quiet place to do their business. Also – remember cats are extremely proud animals. They don’t like to be watched while in a compromising position in the litter box, so make sure you give them enough privacy. Handle with care
Picking up an adult cat by the scruff of the neck is a big no-no. When cats are very young, their mothers often pick them up and carry them this way, but as cats get older and heavier, this can be damaging. Picking your cat up by the scruff should only be done in emergency situations, for very short periods – and always support their rump. Rather pick up your cat with both hands – one hand holding the cat under the chest, just behind their front legs. Use your other hand to support the back legs and bottom. But remember, sometimes cats just don’t want to be picked up, so always read their mood and don’t force anything. Don’t string them along
We’ve all seen depictions of cats playing with and chewing on string or yarn. This can actually be a choking hazard and is very dangerous. If swallowed, it can make your cat quite sick – causing blockages in the stomach and serious digestive problems. So keep your sewing and knitting safely packed away, out of reach, and invest in safe toys. Risky business
While cats are incredibly agile and adventurous, they shouldn’t be encouraged to test the limits. If you live in an apartment at or above second floor level, keep windows closed or fit a screen or gate over them.


Cats can be highly susceptible to allergies and intolerance. These can be derived from environmental factors, as well as aversions to certain foods. While many of these allergies can be seasonal, some may persist throughout your cat’s life, and will need the relevant care to minimize the impact on your precious pet’s physical health and overall well being. The most prevalent symptoms include sneezing, wheezing and skin irritations, and the cause must be treated in order to give your cat some relief.

Dust, mound and pollen are the most common allergens for cats, and while they are primarily linked to the summer and spring seasons, their effects can be diminished by making sure your house is clean. Regular dusting and keeping a dry, moisture free home is the first step. If you find that after this, your cat is still sneezing for an extended period, seek the advice of your vet, as your cat may need a feline antihistamine.

When it comes to food allergies, you have to be a bit more careful. While some allergies are developed from when your cat is a kitten, others develop later in life. It’s best not to handle these yourself, as you may aggravate the symptoms further.

The best course of action is to take your cat to the vet immediately, and make sure that you can supply the vet with as much information about the food your cat is eating, their feeding schedule and when the symptoms are most prevalent.

Usually, vets will place your cat on a diet which individually eliminates one ingredient at a time, in order to figure out which foods trigger particular symptoms. These symptoms may include inflamed skin or itching. If this is the case, your vet will advise on the best course of action to manage these symptoms. This may involve switching to a hypoallergenic food option.


Diabetes is a serious medical condition which, like in the case of humans, can seriously affect your cat’s quality of life. Simply put – diabetes is a condition caused by a lack, or deficiency of insulin, which is the hormone which regulates how sugar is used in the body. The biggest issue when it comes to feline diabetes is that sugar is not properly absorbed into the cells and tissues in the body. Particularly if your cat is a regular eater, who maintains a stable weight, the presence of diabetes is often marked by significant weight loss – even though your cat is eating and drinking the same amount. Increased urination is also a tell-tale sign.
It’s important to make sure you have a plan, and the resources to look after your cat with diabetes. After the initial diagnosis, your cat will require regular visits to the vets, as well as treatment to address their insulin absorption. This treatment will come in the form of one to two insulin injections per day, which are administered under your cat’s skin. While you may be a little squeamish, and wary of hurting your cat – this is vital for their immediate and long term health and the vet will make sure that you are trained as to how to perform the injections correctly. As a general rule, it is important to ensure that your cat has eaten at least half of their allotted portion when the insulin is administered. In most cases, you will not be required to do home blood tests, unless directed by your vet. If you are, a helpful tool to invest in is a blood glucose monitor, which requires a tiny sample of your cat’s blood to check their glucose levels. Most cats who have a healthy diet, adequate access to healthcare and treatment have a positive prognosis and can even go into partial remission. However, it’s important to monitor your cat’s water intake, eating habits and ensure that they are engaging in regular exercise. If you believe your cat may have diabetes, please seek the advice of a vet urgently.


Urinary issues, although reasonably uncommon in cats, can be very serious. While your cat may be stoic, or like humans, expect the issue to go away on its own, their inability to communicate means that it’s important for cat owners to know how to spot a potential issue. The most common problems are blockages in the bladder or a cat urinary tract infection. Crystals or small stones in the urine can be the cause, and these can develop as a result of dehydration, irregular bathroom habits or a more serious disease. These crystals can irritate the lining of the urinary tract, blocking the regular flow or urine, causing toxins to build-up. When this starts to happen, you may notice that your cat tends to cry out or vocalize when urinating, because of the pain. Other signs can be straining to urinate, urinating outside the litter box or even pacing anxiously, crying constantly or even hiding. If you notice any of these signs, don’t just wait for the issue to pass. Particularly if this is affecting a male cat, contact your cat’s vet urgently, because a urethral infection can infect their kidneys. Courses of treatment may include an initial examination, a course of antibiotics and may even require the removal of the stones in critical cases.


Cats are just as susceptible to digestive issues as humans, but without the ability to communicate with us, their symptoms can get worse very quickly.

The most common digestive issues in cats are diarrhea (fast moving bowels) and constipation (slow moving bowels), both of which can be caused by a range of factors including a change in diet, increased stress, eating foreign objects – and in more serious cases, infections or parasites.

Both conditions are often accompanied by vomiting or your cat refusing to eat. However, in some cases, like humans, digestive issues can be chronic. Cats can also be prone to gastroenteritis, irritable bowel syndrome and even pancreatitis. It’s essential to have the right information and support to best manage your cat’s digestive health.Get a professional opinion
Whether you think you know what is wrong with your cat, or your cat is just generally fussy, ‘waiting to see’ is never the right course of action, because simple infections can develop into serious issues if left unattended.

In addition to monitoring their eating and toilet habits, consult a vet as soon as you notice any change. Don’t attempt any home remedies, force your cat to eat or change their food again – this could make the situation worse.

If you have more than one cat, and one cat gets sick, limit their interaction as much as possible in case the condition is contagious. Make sure your cats have separate bowls to eat and drink from and have a litter box for each cat.


In recent years, the pet supplement industry has boomed – with a range of product options claiming to support different functions. However, these should be approached with care and a very specific understanding of your cat’s needs.Most cats receive all the nutrition they need from eating a complete and balanced diet.
Most complex cat foods, which have been developed to meet their dietary needs offer complete nutrition.

Moreover, cat foods developed specifically for kittens, adult cats and mature cats, are designed to ensure your cat receives the correct nutrition for their age and physical needs. As a result, the addition of a vitamin or supplement without consultation with a vet, could actually result in toxicity.

If your cat has certain health issues, or gets sick easily and often, it may be time to speak to your cat’s vet about whether supplements (or other supportive treatments) could help.


Taking on a cat as a fur kid and companion is not always easy. Cats can be very strong-willed about their needs, and it’s important as a cat owner to priorities their well being over their preferences – and demands.

Where health is concerned, ignoring your cat’s weight problem is never an option. A cute, fat cat may be nice to look at and cuddle, but in the long term, overweight or obese cats can suffer physically, mentally and emotionally.How do I know if my cat is overweight?
One of the first signs that your cat has a weight problem is not being able to feel their ribs. Additionally, if your cat struggles to walk or run, or is unusually sluggish, these may be indicators that their weight is already taking its toll.

Obesity in cats can make everyday activities more difficult and less enjoyable, and ultimately shorten their lifespan. Diabetes, an under performing immune system and problems with digestion also come with the territory – but can be avoided with a switch to a healthier diet for your cat. Remember, you are in control of this.What can I do about my cat’s weight?
If your cat has put on a lot of weight, or has begun to display the above symptoms, the first step is to lower their calorie intake. This can be achieved by switching to a lower-calorie cat food, offering smaller portions of dry or wet food during the day, and if you feel you need more support, approaching your vet for a specific weight management program.

Every cat’s needs are different, and depending on the severity of the situation, and the causes, your vet’s involvement will be crucial to providing a long-term diet plan which protects the health, well-being and happiness of your cat.


We all know cats like to take the lead on keeping themselves clean, but that’s not always the case when it comes to their teeth. Like humans, cats have very sensitive mouths, and looking after oral health is very important to their overall well-being. Diet plays a big role in the health of your cat’s teeth. Dry, crunchy foods, like PAMPER's dry foods, help to keep their teeth clean. While your cat is chewing, the particles and friction from the dry food scrape against the surface of the teeth – just like a human’s toothbrush. Something’s fishy…
While dry food takes care of every day dental health, there are some signs your cat may need a little extra help. While it’s normal for your cat to have slightly fishy-smelling breath, seriously foul breath is cause for concern. Another red flag is any evidence of drooling. While this is reasonably common in dogs, in cats it can indicate a gum ailment. Regular cleaning
One of the ways to prevent problems with oral health is to take more regular care of your cat’s teeth. It’s important to get your cat into the habit of having their teeth cleaned from when they are kittens, as older cats can be particularly resistant (to put it lightly). Ideally, cats should have their teeth cleaned twice-weekly to help prevent dangerous and painful dental diseases. It also ensures any small issues don’t become serious because they’ve been left unattended. Get started
The best place to start is to consult your vet and ask for a demonstration on how to clean your cats’ teeth safely. If your cat resists, hisses or bites when you attempt to clean their pearly whites, it is best to schedule in regular sessions with the vet and leave it to the professionals.


We’re thrilled to have launched PAMPER Dry food in-store, and we can’t wait for your cat to try it (that’s if they haven’t got their paws on it already). However, whoever said change is as good as a holiday, never tried to change a cat’s dietary habits. We know how fussy cats can be and how sensitive they are to the slightest changes in their routine. That’s why the experts at MARTIN&MARTIN have been working around the clock to ensure a smooth transition as changes to PAMPER in-store. With a new locally-based manufacturing process, we have made every effort to try and match the dry food flavour profile as closely as possible along with some necessary tweaks to the recipe. This is all to ensure your cat stays happy, healthy and falls in love with the new food. Here’s are our tips on how to make the transition from FRISKIES to PAMPER as smooth as possible for your fussy feline: Take it slow – change can take time
A gradual transition will make things easier for your cat. Over a seven-day period, slowly decrease the amount of FRISKIES food in their bowl while increasing the amount of PAMPER. The first day should be purely FRISKIES, and then the second day, mix in a little bit of PAMPER into their bowl. By day four and five, the products should be in similar quantities, and by the end of the week, your cat should be feeling comfortable eating a full bowl of PAMPER. Get hands on with the transition
Consider hand-feeding your cat some PAMPER dry food, at least initially. Cats are likely to trust what you feed them directly, so whoever is doing the hand-feeding must have a good relationship with your cat. Be careful not to feed your cat too much at a time, as the sheer amount can be a turn off. The process may take some time for fussy eaters, but it will be worth it. Worrying about your cat’s favourite FRISKIES pouches? Don’t. The recipe is staying exactly the same and the only thing changing is the name on the packaging.

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